20 January 2022

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Loretta Bearcub

Loretta Bearcub


Loretta Norma (Blackdog) Bearcub, Napé TȟawówašI (Works with Her Hands), 93, of Fort Kipp died Dec. 24, 2021, at at the Culbertson Medical Center in Culbertson. She was born March 14, 1928, in Fort Kipp to James Blackdog Jr. and Bertha Littlehead. She graduated from Brockton High School and went on to nursing school. She eventually worked at the Columbus Hospital in Great Falls, Poplar IHS hospital and the Culbertson hospital. She married Archie Bearcub Sr. and they built their home just west of Fort Kipp where she spent her entire life. From that union, they had six children. She went on to serve with various groups and committees such as the Brockton School board, Poplar Indian Days and many years on the Fort Kipp Celebration committee. She was also part of the ladies auxiliary. She worked the Community Services program for the Fort Peck Tribes where she eventually retired. After retirement, she became an aide for the Fort Kipp Headstart Center until she could no longer work. She enjoyed powwows, watching her son sing, her granddaughter dance and, most of all, sewing. She also enjoyed attending and watching basketball games. She was well known for her quilting skills and was mentioned qn a publication as a master Quilter. Traveling was probably one of her most favorite things to do. She would drive herself all over the country and, at one time ,made it all the way to Europe to visit family. She was preceded in death by her husband, Archie Bearcub Sr.; infant son, Louis Bearcub; infant twin sons; brothers, Louis Blackdog, James Blackdog Jr., Matthew Blackdog and Vincent Blackdog; sisters, Teresa Blackdog, Sarah Blackdog, Ursula (Blackdog) Longhair and Rozelda (Blackdog) LoansArrow; grandsons, Duane Blackdog, Isaac Blackdog, William (Billy)Blackdog, Jeff Stump, Wesley Longhair, Nathaniel Longhair Jr., Brandon Longhair, Myron BrokenLeg, Ivan BrokenLeg, Brandon Longhair, Adam Blackdog, Armon Blackdog, Chris Blackdog, Cameron Blackdog and Ryan Blackdog; and granddaughers, Darla BrokenLeg, Valerie Youpee, Natalie Longhair, Alesia Blackdog and Laurelle Green. She is survived by her children, Patricia Ryerson, Archie Bearcub Jr. and Jennifer Bearcub; numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Funeral services were Saturday, Jan. 8, at James Black Dog Center. Interment was at the Bearcub Family Cemetery in Fort Kipp. Clayton Stevenson Memorial Chapel was entrusted with arrangements.

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Ida Moran

Ida Moran


Ida Ruth Thomas Moran, 57, died Dec. 29, 2021, at Poplar Community Hospital. She was born June 13, 1964, to Mike Thomas Sr. and Fonda Crystal Bighorn. She was a little shy, but that didn’t stop her from “apple Ida” mascot for the 1968 Brockton Warriors. Being a social butterfly and having many cousins, brothers and sisters helped her develop skills she used throughout her life. She started and finished school in Brockton. In high school, she excelled as a Lady Warrior. Many special memories and friends were made during her school years. She always talked about her classmates and teammates. She talked about their senior trip and running out of gas coming into Great Falls. She started working and driving at a young age. She talked of driving her Grandpa Bill while feeding cows, getting cursed at for popping the clutch. She talked of chasing cows with her uncle Clyde and enjoyed sitting with her cousins Kristen, Keith and Joe. She worked at the drivein for Keith Sybil. She talked of her aunts Jackie and Alda and of tournaments or softball games they attended. Babysitting was always her favorite job and she loved babies. Her younger brothers and sisters were like her own children. She worked at the pool in her younger years. She worked for tribal health for over 25 years as a CHR and optician. Working with the eyeglasses, she knew and met many people from around the reservation and beyond. She retired when her rheumatoid arthritis started to affect her hands. She also wanted to stay home and take care of her children and grandchildren. She accomplished many things in life. The things she was the proudest of, her family and her marriage of 37 years and 363 days, just two days shy of 38 years. She is survived by her husband, Kent Shane Moran; children, Shane, Lane, Shanni, J’Lanie and Dwain; numerous grandchildren; mother, Fonda Bighorn; and sisters, Thomasine, Iva and Misty Blue. She was predeceased by grandsons, Baby Dwain and Baylor Spotted Bird, Mercy White Bear; and brothers, Michael and Andrew Thomas and Vincent Chuck Moran. Funeral services were held Tuesday, Jan. 11, at the Lindsey Church in Poplar. Interment was at Poplar City Cemetery. Clayton Stevenson Memorial Chapel was entrusted with arrangements.

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Dr. Caleb Shields

Dr. Caleb Shields


Dr. Caleb Shields, Wambdi Wahachanka, Eagle Shield, 83, died Jan. 1, 2022, in Mesa, Ariz. He was born April 15, 1938, to Fred Shields Sr. and Frances Smith in Poplar at the old hospital building. He grew up on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation and in several West Coast cities where his parents worked in the shipyards during World War II. He attended various schools. In the early years, he went to school in Seattle, Wash., and Portland, Ore. He then attended a few years of grade school in Poplar and one year at the Old Day School in Fort Kipp. From there, he went to Pierre Indian School in South Dakota from fifth through eighth grade. He spent his first two years of high school at Flandreau Indian Vocational High School in South Dakota and finished his last two years of high school in Poplar, graduating in 1956. Right after graduation, he enlisted in the U.S. Navy and spent seven years serving our country aboard an aircraft carrier, destroyer and finally with the SeaBees, a mobile construction battalion. After military service, he attended Western States College of Engineering in Los Angeles, Calif., majoring in electronic engineering. During this time, he met Yvonne LaRoque while she was employed at the Bureau of Indian Affairs. They married in Compton, Calif., at Our Lady of Victory Catholic Church on Nov. 30, 1963. His employment field was within Vanguard Electronics, a major aerospace firm. He advanced within the company and became their operations manager for a plant opened in Mexicali, Mexico, to manufacture and assemble electronic components for the space industry. He spent four years working at the Mexican facilities until he had the opportunity to return home to work for the Fort Peck Tribes as the director of the Fort Peck Planning District in 1974. He entered the political arena in 1975 when he successfully ran for the tribal executive board, where he served for eight terms before his election to the chairman’s position in 1991. He served as chairman until 1997, then ran for another term on the tribal council until his retirement from politics in 1999. While chairman, he worked on improving relations between the state and tribal governments and preserving the reservation’s natural resources, water in particular. In 1992, with the help of tribal attorney Mary Pavel of the Sonosky & Chambers firm in Washington, D.C., an initiative was developed to set the path for the tribes’ water pipeline and water treatment center project. The project addressed the need for quality water on the reservation and throughout northeastern Montana in response to energy development contamination of water sources, according to The History of the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, a book Shields co-authored. In September 2012, 20 years after he set in motion the process to build the pipeline project, the Fort Peck Tribes dedicated its new water treatment plant in honor of him and named it the “Wambdi Wahachanka (Eagle Shield) Water Treatment Facility, in honor of his Indian name. He was also among several dozen Fort Peck Tribal members that were proud members of the American Indian Movement, a national activist organization which formed to address poverty, discrimination and police brutality among Native Americans. He was also a devoted Poplar Indians fan who frequently served as announcer for the teams’ star quilt ceremonies at the district basketball tournaments as well as sitting in the stands cheering on his children and grandchildren. He enjoyed all kinds of music, including powwow and Sundance songs and classical music. He enjoyed dancing at powwows and participated in the Sundance ceremony during the summers. In 2009, he received an honorary doctorate degree of human letters from the University of Montana. He led a joint task force to assemble and coordinate a book, The History of the Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, Montana, 1800-2000. Publishing the book was a tireless effort and a dream of his for many years. He was also a frequent visitor to Washington, D.C., where he incessantly lobbied on behalf of the Tribes and Indian Country. He loved his family unconditionally. He had close relationships with all of his siblings and kept in regular contact. He was proud of his children and grandchildren in all that they did including their educational and military milestones. He is survived by his wife, Yvonne; son, Anthony Shields Sr.; daughter, Suzanne Boyd; brothers, Stoney Anketell, Chet and Chuck Eagleman; sisters, Roseann Shields, Sherry Shields and Sandy Azure; and numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his daughter, Antoinette Shields; brother, Fred Shields Jr.; and sisters, Joy Shields, June Stafne and Shirley Redstone. Funeral services were held Saturday, Jan. 15, at the Poplar Cultural Center. Interment was at Poplar City Cemetery. Clayton Stevenson Memorial Chapel was entrusted with arrangements.

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