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Five Active COVID-19 Cases Remain In Roosevelt County

Five Active COVID-19 Cases Remain In Roosevelt County Five Active COVID-19 Cases Remain In Roosevelt County

Montana began a three-phase plan of reopening Monday, April 27.

Montana Governor Steve Bullock said Monday, April 27, “We’ve officially started Phase One of Montana’s gradual reopening. But let me be clear: we could be in this first phase for a long time. We will not move out of Phase One if the curve doesn’t remain flat.”

As of Tuesday, April 28, Roosevelt County reported five active cases of COVID-19 with two listed as recovered. The last new cases in Roosevelt County was reported Monday, April 20.

For up-to-date information on COVID-19, go to dphhs.mt.gov.

Roosevelt County

Roosevelt County’s Plan of Action through Friday, May 1, was released late last week. All Roosevelt County Buildings shall remain open; however, public access shall be limited. Members of the public who need to access services at a Roosevelt County buildings shall call and make an appointment. Only one member of the public is allowed in the lobby at a time in every county building. Doors of all Roosevelt County buildings shall be locked.

When making the appointment, the department will arrange the time and will have a staff person at the designated door to escort the member of the public into the building. To the greatest extent possible, the public is encouraged to conduct business online, by telephone or by fax. The phone number to the main switchboard and all departments shall be posted on all doors.

Fort Peck Tribes

According to Tribal Executive Board member Kaci Wallette, restrictions and guidelines set in place by the Fort Peck Tribes will remain in place past the date for easing restrictions set down by Governor Bullock.

“We are staying closed tentatively until May 22,” said Wallette. “All our tribal restrictions will be in place until then.”

Wallette confirmed that curfew, shelter in place and state of emergency orders will remain in effect. Non-essential enrolled-member- owned businesses like casinos will remain closed. Wallette added that May 22 is a target date and may change.

“If we have no new cases for an extended period of time, we will do a phased re-opening before that date and, if we have an influx of new cases, it will be after that date.”

Confirmed COVID-19 Cases

At presstime, there were 451 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Mon- COVID-19

tana, up from 437 on Tuesday, April 21. Of those cases, 356 are listed as recovered. There have been 61 total hospitalizations, with 10 hospitalizations listed as active. Fifteen people have died from the virus. Most are treating their symptoms at home. As of 10 a.m. Tuesday, April 28, a total of 13,191 tests had been completed.

Williams County in North Dakota has reported 10 cases of COVID-19 on Tuesday morning, April 28. Mountrail County has reported 35 cases. Ward County has 21 reported cases. At presstime, there have been 991 cases reported in North Dakota, with 409 individuals listed as recovered. Seventy-nine have required hospitalization with 25 currently hospitalized. Nineteen deaths have been reported in North Dakota.

Wild Horse Stampede Committee The Wolf Point Wild Horse Stampede Committee issued

the following press release April 28: “The Wild Horse Stampede is on schedule and planning to be held July 9-11; however, we are closely monitoring the current regulations from Gov. Bullock’s directives and the local health department. We will be making a final decision by June 1 according to the most updated directives.”

MHSA Sports

The Montana High School Association issued a final decision to cancel spring sports, music programs and other school activities Wednesday, May 22, just hours after Gov. Steve Bullock announced a three-tiered reopening of Montana.

Under Bullock’s plan, public school districts could open for classes May 7, three days after the deadline MHSA had set earlier of Monday, May 4, for students to return to classes, which was a condition for activities to return with shortened seasons.

This cancellation, a health and safety decision related to the COVID-19 pandemic, is the first time in 77 years, since 1943, that Montana has canceled a sports season.

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